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komlin:

livingonmusicals:

komlin:

livingonmusicals:

komlin:

livingonmusicals:

ok y’all 

how do i ask a boy out 

roses are red
violets are blue
guess what, my bed
has room for two

OH MY GOD NO

twinkle twinkle little star
we can do it in a car

STOP IT

row, row, row your boat
gently down the stream
merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily
i can make you scream

(via shit-sucks)

Source: bearsnbritts
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intuitivegrace:

lyssa-fer:

darkpancakelord:

deckster:

REBLOG: go to your blog and click the egg to see what hatches

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I got Sonic the Hedgehog.

Sonic the fucking Hedgehog.


Maybe I cracked the egg too fast.

I got a little dog and I think it’s from Animal Crossing but I’m not sure

Ah, I got Isabelle. =3

Source: blackpowwer
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Man Gets Job When He Adds "Mr." To His Resume

autumnyte:

sissyviscount:

This man was being turned down and rejected from every job he applied for, despite being more than qualified for a lot of them. After four months, he realized that everyone he sent his resume to was assuming he was a woman because his first name was Kim. Once he added “Mr.” to it, he got an interview for the very next job he applied for. And the next one. And the one after that. In less than two weeks, he had a job with a considerably higher position than he had ever held before.

Please, tell me more about how gender-based job discrimination doesn’t exist.

"I had fortunately seen a number of CVs in my time. I was happy with the choice of style and layout, and the balance of detail versus brevity. I was particularly pleased with the decision I made to brand it with my name, with just enough bold positioning to make it instantly recognizable. And as I sat scouring every detail of that CV, a horrible truth slowly dawned on me. It was my name.

My first name is Kim. Technically it’s gender neutral, but my experience showed that most people’s default setting in the absence of any other clues is to assume Kim is a woman’s name. And nothing else on my CV identified me as male. At first I thought I was being a little paranoid but engineering, trades, sales and management were all definitely male dominated industries. So I pictured all the managers I had over the years and, forming an amalgam of them in my mind, I read through the document as I imagined they would have. It was like being hit on the head with a big sheet of unbreakable glass ceiling.

My choice to brand the CV with a bold positioning of my name actually seemed to scream that I was a woman. I could easily imagine many of the people I had worked for discarding the document without reading further. If they did read further, the next thing they saw (as politeness declared at the time) was a little personal information, and that declared that I was married with kids. I had put this in because I knew many employers would see it as showing stability, but when I viewed it through the skewed view of middle-aged men who thought I was a woman, I could see it was just further damning my cause. I doubt if many of the managers I had known would have made it to the second page.”


The bolded is 100% accurate, too. For a man, being married with kids makes him more employable, because it’s thought that a family is good motivation for him to work hard and stay in a job. For a woman, you are encouraged to keep that off your resume and not mention it in interviews. It’s absolutely seen a strike against your favor, because everyone anticipates it’s going to be the mom who’ll stay home with the kids if they’re sick… and you might even have the audacity to get pregnant again while employed. 

(via anenglishgentleman)

Source: compasswaters